Monthly Archives: August 2014

Framley Parsonage on BBC Radio 4

The first episode of the BBC’s latest adaptation of Trollope’s novels of Barsetshire will be broadcast at 3pm on Sunday 31 August 2014.

Dramatised by Nick Warburton, this is the fourth novel in the series and will be broadcast in 3 hour long episodes. It is produced and directed by Marion Nancarrow.

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Trollope solves global financial crisis

Listen to BBC Radio 4 at 1:45pm today to find out how.

Writer Lucy Mangan selects five different economic remedies from literature. Today, she looks inside The Last Chronicle of Barset by Trollope.

In this witty and enlightening series, Lucy searches for economic solutions in her bookshelves. She talks to Andrew Oswald from the University of Warwick and Mary Morgan from the London School of Economics about what literature can contribute to the economic recovery debate.

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Trollope is better than Dickens

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I am grateful to Jim Fretz who found this article by Elizabeth Mitchell on the Mancunion.com website. She argues a line with which, I am sure, many Trollopians would agree.  She suggests that it may be attributed to Trollope’s sympathetic treatment of the Irish question that was potentially unpalatable to a Victorian audience which might find it uncomfortably close to a truth they would prefer to ignore.

There is, I feel, a sense of injustice among Trollope fans that he should be perpetually compared unfavourably with Dickens.

Personally, I love both writers but for different things. Dickens is polemical.  He strikes out with conscious effort against wrongs he perceives.  In doing so, his style sometimes shouts. He charicatures. Trollope is more subtle. He persuades with gentler nudges.  But is nontheless, to my mind, equally powerful for all that. His targets are sometimes less obvious, but he invariably finds his mark, whether that be the Irish issues in The MacDermots of Ballycloran, as Mitchell contends, or political shenanigans in the later books of the Palliser series.

http://www.mancunion.com/2013/04/29/why-anthony-trollope-is-a-better-version-of-charles-dickens/

 

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Trollope – the lost novel

I am grateful to Mark Anderson who found reference to Trollope in the diary entry of Irish poet William Allingham for 26th May 1868. Allingham was visiting his friend Robert Browning who showed him some new works including an idea based on the trial of Count Guido in Italy. Browning said that he had discussed the idea with Trollope with a view to Trollope writing a novel based on the storyline but Trollope had declined. Browning had therefore decided to do something with it himself.

Who knows what Trollope might have made of the story? His only work that is based on historical fact, La Vendee, met with little success so perhaps he was wary of writing about real events. Perhaps by this stage Trollope knew that his strength lay in creating imaginative fiction set in an English milieu?

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New TV adaptation of novel by Iain Banks

The BBC has commissioned an adaptation of Iain Banks’ novel Stonemouth to be broadcast next year. Set in a fictional village in Scotland, the book explores the complex relationships and events that culminated in the death of the protagonist’s close friend which bring him back to the place where he grew up.

One wonders if this production may be affected by the outcome of the referendum on Scottish independence.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-28881411

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Work, marry well…or write

I am grateful to Jane Woolley Reardon for spotting the reference to Trollope in the Spectator:

“At the dinner (above) a young man asked Roger Kimball what to do if you want to be a writer but have no money to see you through the early years? Kimball referred to the American poet Wallace Stevens who worked in insurance all his life, and to Anthony Trollope who worked for the post office. A writer writes because he must, whatever the circumstances. You don’t have to depend on a tax-payer hand-out. Or you can always marry well…”
http://www.spectator.co.uk/australia/australian-notes/9288862/australian-notes-225/

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Signed Dickens Novel on sale for £275,000

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The copy of A Tale of Two Cities, signed by Dickens and presented to fellow novelist George Elliott is to be sold with an asking price of £275,000. If it reaches this value, then it will be the most expensive Dickens book ever sold.

I wonder what a signed Trollope might fetch in today’s market.  Considerably less than this figure I am sure.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-28854998

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